Chemical Ecology...

... examines the role of chemical signals that mediate the interactions between plants, animals, and their environment, as well as the evolutionary and behavioral consequences of these interactions. In the Institute, organic chemists, biochemists, ecologists, entomologists, behavioral scientists, insect geneticists and physiologists work in collaboration to unravel the complexity of chemical communication that occurs in nature.

The primary research focus of the Institute is on the coevolution of plants and insect herbivores. The constant struggle of plants and insects as played out on the chemical theatre is the key to understanding the interactions that have produced the variety of species that exist today.

Because plants are sessile organisms, they are limited in their possibilities to produce offspring and escape from herbivores and pathogens. They have overcome such constraints by producing a large variety of chemicals that are used to attract pollinators, disperse seeds, attract mycorrhizal mutualists, repel herbivores, attract the natural enemies of their herbivores, protect against pathogens and various abiotic insults, and inhibit competitors. Plants produce complex mixtures of organic compounds that function in these different roles and we examine how these compounds are made, how they contribute to a plant’s Darwinian fitness in natural environments and how they evolved in the process of evolution.

Insects in turn have evolved mechanisms to avoid, detoxify, or excrete these compounds, or even to sequester and modify them for their own uses. Particularly successful mechanisms may enable formation of new insect species, capable of exploiting different plant hosts. Conversely, the formation of new plant species that can escape from herbivory may be promoted by the development of successful counter-mechanisms or novel compounds. Of special interest is the olfactory system of insects: How do insects perceive the plants' odor vocabulary and how does the perception of smells influence their behavior - when they search for food, sexual mates or the ideal place for laying their eggs?

Directors and Scientific Members of the Max Planck Society

Prof. Dr. Ian T. Baldwin (Department of Molecular Ecology)
Fon: +49 (0)3641 - 57 1101
Fax: +49 (0)3641 - 57 1102

Prof. Dr. Jonathan Gershenzon (Department of Biochemistry)
Fon: +49 (0)3641 - 57 1301
Fax: +49 (0)3641 - 57 1302

Prof. Dr. Wilhelm Boland (Department of Bioorganic Chemistry)
Fon: +49 (0)3641 - 57 1201
Fax: +49 (0)3641 - 57 1202

Prof. Dr. Bill S. Hansson (Department of Evolutionary Neuroethology)
Fon: +49 (0)3641 - 57 1401
Fax: +49 (0)3641 - 57 1402

Prof. Dr. David G. Heckel (Department of Entomology)
Fon: +49 (0)3641 - 57 1501
Fax: +49 (0)3641 - 57 1502

Research Group Leaders

Dr. Franziska Beran (Research Group Sequestration and Detoxification in Insects)
Fon: +49 (0)3641 - 57 1553
Fax: +49 (0)3641 - 57 1502

Dr. Christian Kost (VW Research Group Experimental Ecology and Evolution)
Fon: +49 (0)3641 - 57 1212
Fax: +49 (0)3641 - 57 1202

Prof. Dr. Georg Pohnert (Max Planck Fellow Group "Chemical Ecology of Plankton")
Fon: +49 (0)3641 - 94-8170
Fax: +49 (0)3641 - 94-8172

Dr. Silke Sachse (BMBF Research Group Olfactory Coding)
Fon: +49 (0)3641 - 57 1416
Fax: +49 (0)3641 - 57 1402

Dr. Bernd Schneider (Biosynthesis/NMR)
Fon: +49 (0)3641 - 57 1600
Fax: +49 (0)3641 - 57 1601

Dr. Aleš Svatoš (Mass Spectrometry/Proteomics)
Fon: +49 (0) 3641 - 57 1700
Fax: +49 (0) 3641 - 57 1701

Former Research Groups

Prof. Dr.  Matthias Erb (former Research Group Root-Herbivore Interactions)
University of Bern
Institute of Plant Sciences
Biotic Interactions
Altenbergrain 21
3013 Bern, Switzerland
Fon:  +41 31 631 86 68
E-Mail: matthias.erb@ips.unibe.ch


Prof. Dr. Martin Kaltenpoth (former Max Planck Research Group Insect Symbiosis)
Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz
Institute of Zoology
Department of Evolutionary Ecology
Johann-Joachim-Becher-Weg 13
55128 Mainz
Fon: +49 6131-39-24411
E-Mail: mkaltenpoth@uni-mainz.de